Our Stones

Group A

All our products are priced according to a subdivision in groups

according to the cost of each gemstone.

Here we have some information about the nature of each one of them:

Natural Citrine

Citrine is a transparent variety of quartz with a yellow to orange color. Its attractive color, high clarity, and durability make it the most frequently purchased yellow to orange gem.

Pink Amethyst

Natural rosy quartz geodes were recently discovered in beautiful Patagonia, Argentina and exude beautiful tones of rose, mauve and salmon pink tones. The color of Pink Amethyst comes from inclusions of hematite and iron inside the quartz points.

A-Pink-Amethyst-b.png
A-Larimar-b.png

Larimar

Larimar, also called "Stefilia's Stone", is a rare blue variety of the silicate mineral pectolite found only in the Dominican Republic, in the Caribbean. Its coloration varies from white, light-blue, green-blue to deep blue.

A-Natural-citrine-b.png

Group B

Pyrite

Pyrite is a brass-yellow mineral with a bright metallic luster. It has a chemical composition of iron sulfide (FeS2) and is the most common sulfide mineral. It forms at high and low temperatures and occurs, usually in small quantities, in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks worldwide. 

B-Pyrite-b.png
B-Stalactite-b.png

Stalactite

A stalactite is an icicle-shaped formation that hangs from the ceiling of a cave and is produced by precipitation of minerals from water dripping through the cave ceiling. Most stalactites have pointed tips.

Labradorite

Labradorite is a feldspar mineral of the plagioclase series that is most often found in mafic igneous rocks such as basalt, gabbro, and norite. It is also found in anorthosite, an igneous rock in which labradorite can be the most abundant mineral. Some specimens of labradorite exhibit a schiller effect, which is a strong play of iridescent blue, green, red, orange, and yellow colors. Labradorite is so well known for these spectacular displays of color that the phenomenon is known as "labradorescence." Specimens with the highest quality labradorescence are often selected for use as gemstones.

C-Larimar-b.png
B-Fluorite-b.png

Fluorite

Fluorites come in many colors, including colorless. Most available stones occur in shades of purple, blue, or green. Chrome green material from Colombia and pink gems are rare. Lapidaries can cut multi-colored gems (sometimes called “rainbow fluorites”) from color zoned crystals, too.

Apatite

Apatite is a very common mineral but transparent gemstone-quality is extremely rare. Because apatite occurs in such a wide variety of attractive colors and forms, it is a favorite among gemstone collectors. The name ‘apatite’ was derived from a Greek word meaning ‘cheat’. It was given its name because of its close resemblance to several other gemstones that are often more valuable.

B-Apatite-b.png
B-Mookaite-b.png

Mokaite

The name mookaite comes from the Aboriginese word, mooka, meaning "running waters." What we don't know is whether the Aboriginese named the Mooka Creek first or the stone found in its running waters. Mookaite jasper colors cover a wide range of warm earth tones which can include brick red, cream, brown, gold and mauve.

Group C

Druzy

A druzy is sets of tiny crystals of minerals that form on the surface of another stone. There are many types of druzy, because there are many types of minerals. Each type of druzy has particular characteristics, such as crystal size, luster and color.

Amethyst

Amethyst is the world's most popular purple gem. It is the purple color variety of quartz that has been used in personal adornment for over 2000 years. It is used to produce faceted stones, cabochons, beads, tumbled stones, and many other items for jewelry and ornamental use. Amethyst has a Mohs hardness of 7 and does not break by cleavage. That makes it durable enough for use in rings, bracelets, earrings, pendants, and any type of jewelry. 

Heated Citrine

One of the most impressive specimens of citrine that you might encounter is a large citrine geode from Brazil.  Almost all citrine geodes are discovered with amethyst inside, but are heat treated to convert the purple amethyst into orangy brown citrine.

C-Heated-citrine-b.png
C-Lepidolite-b.png

Lepidolite

Lepidolite is the name of a rare lithium-rich mica mineral that is usually pink, red, or purple in color. It is the most common lithium-bearing mineral and serves as a minor ore of lithium metal, with rubidium and cesium sometimes being byproducts. When impregnated with quartz, lepidolite is used as a minor gemstone. Flakes of lepidolite are sometimes responsible for the color of pink and red aventurine.

Kunzite

The main gem form of Spodumene is Kunzite, the other is the rarer Hiddenite. Yellow and colourless gem forms of Spodumene also exist, but are not commonly faceted as gemstones. Kunzite has a lovely pink colour and is becoming increasingly popular in the gemstone market. The most important deposits of kunzite are from Minas Gerais, Brazil.

C-Kunzite-b.png
C-Watermelon-Tourmaline-b.png

Watermelon Tourmaline

Watermelon tourmaline is one of the most popular types of Tourmaline which displays green, pink, and white color all in just one crystal that makes people think of a watermelon. 

C-Druzy-b.png
C-Amethyst-b.png

Group D

Crystal Quartz

Quartz is the most abundant and widely distributed mineral found at Earth's surface. It is present and plentiful in all parts of the world. It forms at all temperatures. It is abundant in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. It is highly resistant to both mechanical and chemical weathering. This durability makes it the dominant mineral of mountaintops and the primary constituent of beach, river, and desert sand. Quartz is ubiquitous, plentiful and durable. Minable deposits are found throughout the world.

D-Crystal-b.png
D-Smokey-crystal-b.png

Smoky Crystal

Smoky quartz is a gray, translucent version of quartz. It ranges in clarity from almost complete transparency to a brownish-gray crystal that is almost opaque. Some can also be black. The translucency results from natural irradiation acting on minute traces of aluminum in the crystal structure.

Chalcedony

D-Micca-b.png

Micca

Micca, any of a group of hydrous potassium, aluminum silicate minerals. It is a type of phyllosilicate, exhibiting a two-dimensional sheet or layer structure. Among the principal rock-forming minerals, micas are found in all three major rock varieties—igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic.

Aquamarine

Aquamarine is a member of the beryl family. This stone is known for its blue to blue-green colour. The name comes from the Latin for “sea water”.. Aquamarine is a member of the beryl family and ranges in colour from an almost colourless pale blue to blue-green or teal.

D-Aquamarine-b.png
D-Rose-Quartz-b.png

Rose Quartz

Rose quartz is the name used for pink specimens of the mineral quartz. It is abundant, common, and found in large quantities at numerous locations around the world. The pink color of rose quartz is attributed to microscopic inclusions of a pink variety of the mineral dumortierite. These inclusions are usually abundant enough to make the rose quartz translucent instead of transparent. 

D-Druzy-shell-b.png

Group E

E-Blue-Kyanite-b.png